A Sailor's Always Thirsty

things i see, things i make. minus the bear bass guy
fapoffyoursemen:

This is why I love the guys of Minus the Bear. My sister took this photo from the show we went to, tagged the singer and bassist, and the bassist replied with an emojicon thumbs up… Such cool and humble guys

META THUMBS UP!

fapoffyoursemen:

This is why I love the guys of Minus the Bear. My sister took this photo from the show we went to, tagged the singer and bassist, and the bassist replied with an emojicon thumbs up… Such cool and humble guys

META THUMBS UP!

the lion and the goat.

the lion and the goat.

some old stuff

some old stuff

allaboutmary:

A vintage holy card of Mary appearing to St Juan Diego in 1531.

allaboutmary:

A vintage holy card of Mary appearing to St Juan Diego in 1531.

Made some block print variations for the new MTB record. You can pre-order it here… www.minusthebear.com

Made some block print variations for the new MTB record. You can pre-order it here… www.minusthebear.com

distortus:

In Chinese mythology and culture, the three-legged crow is called the Sanzuwu and is responsible for the sun’s passage across the sky. The earliest known depiction of a three-legged crow appears in Neolithic pottery of the Yangzhou culture. The Sanzuwu is used in the decoration of formal imperial silk garments of the Western Han Dynasty 202 BC -220 AD depicts a Sanzuwu perched on a tree.In Japanese mythology, this flying creature is a raven or a Jungle Crow called Yatagarasu and the appearance of the great bird is interpreted as evidence of the will of Heaven or divine intervention in human affairs. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu (reigned 18 February 660 BC - 9 April 585 BC) on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano. In Korean mythology, it is known as Samjok-o. During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom 37 BCE–668 CE, the Samjok-o was a highly regarded emblem of power, thought greater than both the dragon and the Korean phoenix.Raven is the great shape shifter. The three legs symbolize Heaven, Earth and Humanity. It is one of the most universally ancient images of raven, appearing in the China, Japan, Korea, Neolithic site of Newgrange, Celtic art, Scandinavian art, Ancient Italian art, Egyptian art, and cultures throughout Africa.
Image by Larry Vienneau.

distortus:

In Chinese mythology and culture, the three-legged crow is called the Sanzuwu and is responsible for the sun’s passage across the sky. The earliest known depiction of a three-legged crow appears in Neolithic pottery of the Yangzhou culture. The Sanzuwu is used in the decoration of formal imperial silk garments of the Western Han Dynasty 202 BC -220 AD depicts a Sanzuwu perched on a tree.

In Japanese mythology, this flying creature is a raven or a Jungle Crow called Yatagarasu and the appearance of the great bird is interpreted as evidence of the will of Heaven or divine intervention in human affairs. This great crow was sent from heaven as a guide for Emperor Jimmu (reigned 18 February 660 BC - 9 April 585 BC) on his initial journey from the region which would become Kumano. 

In Korean mythology, it is known as Samjok-o. During the period of the Koguryo Kingdom 37 BCE–668 CE, the Samjok-o was a highly regarded emblem of power, thought greater than both the dragon and the Korean phoenix.

Raven is the great shape shifter. The three legs symbolize Heaven, Earth and Humanity. It is one of the most universally ancient images of raven, appearing in the China, Japan, Korea, Neolithic site of Newgrange, Celtic art, Scandinavian art, Ancient Italian art, Egyptian art, and cultures throughout Africa.

Image by Larry Vienneau.

(via hawtdogz)